Advanced Endodontic Access: The Quest for the Extra Canal
You will receive 2 credit(s) of continuing education credit upon successful completion of this course. The purchase price of this course is $82.00

Description:
From MB2 in uppers molars to MM in lower molars, this course clarifies the steps on how to find all canals inside a tooth. The key to finding all the canals in a specific tooth lies in our ability to read and understand the internal anatomy and the map that the floor of each tooth offers.

Author:
American Dental Association, Continuing Education and Peter Zahi Tawil, DMD, MS, FRCD(C) Show Full Bio

Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this course, the participant should be able to:
  1. List the tools needed to facilitate endodontic access
  2. Describe the number of canals that a tooth can contain
  3. Describe the landmarks and the anatomy inside a tooth
  4. Understand the relationships of the pulp chamber to the clinical crown
  5. Understand the relationships on the pulp-chamber floor
  6. Know when to keep looking for extra canals and when to stop
  7. Know how to look for MB2 canals in Upper Maxillary Molars
  8. Know how to look for Middle Mesial Canals in Lower Mandibular Molars

Abstract:
The Quest for the Extra Canal is a mentality all dental clinicians should have in order to find all the canals in any specific tooth. This Quest starts with the proper tools and a proper light source. Once we are properly equipped we will be ready to aim and achieve the perfect access and find all the canals. We will go over the basic anatomy and the number of canals that a clinician have to expect in each tooth of our dentition. When our access is created, we will have to learn to read the floor of this tooth like reading a roadmap. The key to finding all the canals in a specific tooth lies in our ability to read and understand the internal anatomy and the map that the floor of each tooth offers. We will go over the landmarks inside a tooth, the internal anatomy, the shape and the color which will help us find all the canals present in each tooth that we treat. From MB2 in uppers molars to MM in lower molars, this course clarifies the steps on how to find these extra canals.
Outline:
  1. Tools
    1. Rubber dam isolation
    2. Light & Magnification
    3. Mirrors & Micro-Mirrors
    4. Primary burs
    5. Crown access burs
    6. Secondary burs
    7. Ultrasonic tips
    8. Endodontic Explorers
    9. EndoHandle / M4 Handpiece
    10. Triplex Syringe
  2. Endodontic Anatomy
    1. Upper Anteriors
    2. Upper Premolars
    3. Upper Molars
    4. Lower Anteriors
    5. Lower Premolars
    6. Lower Molars
  3. Anatomy Of The Pulp Chamber
    1. Relationship of the pulp chamber to the Clinical Crown
    2. Relationships on the pulp-chamber floor
    3. Practice examples
    4. In Conclusion
  4. Clinical Cases
    1. Upper molar cases
    2. Lower molar cases
    3. Premolar & Anterior case

References:
Periodical
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  2. Bowers DJ, Glickman GN, Solomon ES, HE J. Magnification’s effect on endodontic fine motor skills. J Endod 2010; 36(7):1135-8
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  4. Vertucci FJ. Root canal anatomy of the human permanent teeth. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol 1984; 58(5):589-99
  5. Caliskan MK, Pehlivan Y, Sepetcioglu F, Turkun M, Tuncer SS. Root canal morphology of human permanent teeth in a Turkish population. J Endod 1995; 21(4):200-4
  6. Gondim E Jr, Setzer F, Zingg P, Karabucak B. A maxillary central incisor with three root canals: a case report. J Endod 2009; 35(10):1445-7
  7. Kulild JC, Peters DD. Incidence and configuration of canal systems in the mesiobuccal root of maxillary first and second molars. J Endod 1990; 16(7):311-7
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  12. Baugh D, Wallace J. Middle mesial canal of the mandibular first molar: a case report and literature review. J Endod 2004: 30(3):185-6
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  14. Von Arx T. Frequency and type of canal isthmuses in first molars detected by endoscopic inspection during periradicular surgery. Int Endod J 2005; 38(3):160-8
  15. Jafarzadeh H & Wu YN. The C-shaped root canal configuration: a review. J Endod 2007; 33(5):517-23
  16. Zheng Q, Zhang L, Zhou X, Wang Q, Wang Y, Tang L, Song F, Huang D. C-shaped root canal system in mandibular second molars in a Chinese population evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography. International Endodontic Journal 2011; 44, 857–862
  17. Haddad GY, Nehme WB, Ounsi HF. Diagnosis, classification, and frequency of C-shaped canals in mandibular second molars in the Lebanese population. J Endod 1999; 25(4):268-71
  18. Abbott PV. Assessing restored teeth with pulp and periapical diseases for the presence of cracks, caries and marginal breakdown. Aust Dent J 2004; 49(1):33-9

Book

  1. Cohen S, Hargreaves KM. Pathways of the pulp. 9th ed. St. Louis: Mosby; 2006 





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