Seven Signs and Symptoms of Occlusal Disease (OD)
You will receive 1 unit(s) of continuing education credit upon successful completion of this course. The purchase price of this course is $41.00

Description:
Learn how to implement a methodic and incremental approach to diagnosing OD on every patient. Understand the 7 signs and symptoms of occlusal disease, and how to successfully treat using “3 Golden Rules of Occlusion,” increasing treatment acceptance, restoration longevity and profits.

Author:
American Dental Association, Continuing Education and Jose-Luis Ruiz DDS
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Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this course, the participant should be able to:
  1. Understand why it is so important to treat occlusal disease, if we want our patients to keep their teeth for a life time.
  2. Learn how to implement occlusal treatment into an overall oral treatment.
  3. Identify the 7 signs and symptoms of occlusal disease.
  4. Describe the different stages of occlusal disease.
  5. Recognize the 3 golden rules of occlusion
  6. Learn how to educate patients about occlusal disease, for excellent treatment acceptance.
  7. Understand how to make occlusal treatment a profit center for a highly ethical practice.


Abstract:
Every Dentist should be an expert in managing occlusion; we deal with it on everything we do! “Occlusal disease” is so prevalent and insidious; it is responsible for most restorative failures and no less destructive than decay or periodontal disease. Easy identification and treatment could be a great benefit to our patients, as well as a hugely untapped profit center.

Outline:
  1. Introduction into Occlusal Disease Management System
    1. Why Occlusion is important
    2. Seven Signs and symptoms of OD
    3. How to incorporate Occlusion into extensive restorations
  2. What is Occlusal Disease
    1. Diagnosing OD
  3. How to educate and treat the patient
    1. Treating and maintaining patients with OD
    2. Three Golden Rules of Occlusion
    3. VDO
  4. Case evaluation and trial equilibration
    1. Cast Mounted on Semi-adjustable Articulator
    2. Cast Evaluation & Trial Equilibration
    3. Trial Equilibration
  5. Diagnose First, second consult and treat
    1. Pt. Goals
    2. Dento-Facial Esthetic Diagnosis System
    3. Group esthetics
    4. Gingival Esthetics
    5. Tooth esthetics
  6. Final treatment and conclusion
References:
  1. Ruiz JL Achieving Longevity in Esthetics by Proper Diagnosis and Management of “Occlusal Disease”. 2007 Contemporary Esthetics Vol.11 (6); 24-30 (slide2)
  2. Ruiz JL. Occlusal Disease: Restorative consequences and Patient Education. Dentistry Today 2007Sep 26(9):90-95 (slide 7)
  3. Evaluation, Diagnosis and Treatment of Occlusal Problems” PE Dawson (slide 8)
  4. Ruiz JL. Occlusal Disease: Restorative consequences and Patient Education. Dentistry Today 2007Sep 26(9):90-95 (slide 11)
  5. Ruiz JL Achieving Longevity in Esthetics by Proper Diagnosis and Management of “Occlusal Disease”. 2007 Contemporary Esthetics Vol. 11 (6); 24-30 (slide11)
  6. Ruiz JL. Coleman TA. Occlusal Disease Management System: The Diagnosis Process. Compendium 2008 Vol. 29 No. 3 (slide 11)
  7. Ruiz JL. Seven signs and symptoms of occlusal disease: the key to an easy diagnosis. Dent Today. 2009 Aug;28(8):112-3. (slide 15)
  8. Coleman TA, Grippo JO, et at Cervical dentin hypersensitivity. Part III: Resolution following occlusal equilibration. Quintessence Int. 2003:34:427-434 (slide 17)
  9. Greenstein G, Grenstein B, Cavallaro J. Prerequisite for treatment planning implant dentistry: Periodontal prognostication of compromised teeth. 2007 Compendium 28(8):436-447 (slide 21)
  10. Grippo JO, Abfractions: A new classification of hard tissue lesions of the teeth. J Esthet Dent 1991 Jan-Feb;3(1):14-9 (slide 23)
  11. Telles D, Pegoraro LF et al. Incidence of Non carious cervical lesion…wear facets. J Esthet Rest Dent 2006; 18(4) (slide 25)
  12. Telles D, Pegoraro LF et al. Incidence of Non carious cervical lesion…wear facets. J Esthet Rest Dent 2006; 18(4) Ichim I, Schmidlin PR et al. Mechanical Evaluation of Cervical GI Rest…Finite Element. J Dent 2007; 35 Jan:28-35 (slide 26)
  13. Harrel SK, Nunn ME, Hallmon WW. Is there an association between occlusion…Yes, occlusal forces can contribute to periodontal destruction. JADA; 2006; 137 (10): 1380-1392 (slide 27)
  14. Gremillion HA. The relationship between occlusion and TMD: An evident-based discussion. J Evid Dent Pract 2006;6:43-47 (slide 8)
  15. Ruiz JL. Occlusal Disease: Restorative consequences and Patient Education. Dentistry Today 2007Sep 26(9):90-95 (slide 31)
  16. Ruiz JL Achieving Longevity in Esthetics by Proper Diagnosis and Management of “Occlusal Disease”. 2007 Contemporary Esthetics Vol. 11 (6); 24-30 (slide 31)
  17. Ruiz JL. Coleman TA. Occlusal Disease Management System: The Diagnosis Process. Compendium 2008 Vol. 29 No. 3 (slide31)
  18. Ruiz JL. Occlusal Disease: Restorative consequences and Patient Education. Dentistry Today 2007Sep 26(9):90-95 (slide 34)
  19. Ruiz JL Achieving Longevity in Esthetics by Proper Diagnosis and Management of “Occlusal Disease”. 2007 Contemporary Esthetics Vol. 11 (6); 24-30 (slide 34)
  20. Ruiz JL. Coleman TA. Occlusal Disease Management System: The Diagnosis Process. Compendium 2008 Vol. 29 No. 3 (slide 34)
  21. Lundeen HC, Gibbs C. The Function of Teeth. Book Masters Inc. 2005. DVD Library of Congress #2005930 (slide 3)
  22. Sheikholeslam A. Riise C. Influence of experimental interfering occlusal contacts on the activity of the anterior temporal and masseter muscles … J Oral Rehab 1983; Vol. 10:207-14 (slide 45)
  23. Gibb C. Mahan PE. et al. Limits of Human Bite Strength. J Prosth Dent 1986 Aug;56(2):226 (slide 45)
  24. Barker DK. Occlusal Interfernces and the TM dysfunction. 2004 General dentistry. Jan-Feb;56-62 (slide 46)
  25. Piehslinger E, Celar RM, Horejs T, Slavicek R. Recording orthopedic jaw movements. Part IV: The rotational component during mastication. Cranio. 1994 Jul;12(3):156-60. (slide 47) 
  26. Gibbs CH, Lundeen HC, et al. Chewing movements in relationship to border movements at first molar. J Prosth Dent 1988:46:308-322 (slide 47)
  27. Manns A. Miralles R. Influence of variation in anteroposterior occlusal contacts on electromyographic activity . J Prosthet Dent. 1989 May; 61(5):617-23. (slide 49)
  28. Mansour RM, Reynik RJ. In vivo occlusal forces…Forces measured in terminal hinge position… J Dent Res. 1975 Jan-Feb;54(1):114-20. (slide 49)
  29. Williamson EH. Et al . Anterior guidance: effect on electromyografic activity of the temporalis and maseter J. Prosth Dent 1983; 49:816 (slide 49)
  30. Mann A. Chan et al. Influence of group function and canine guidance on electromyographic activity of elevator muscles. J Prosthet Dent. 1987 Apr;57(4):494-501 (slide 50)
  31. Lundeen & Gibbs. The Function of Teeth. 2005 (slide 50)
  32. Ekfeldt A. Karlsson S. Changes of masticatory movement characteristics after prosthodontic rehabilitation of individuals with extensive tooth wear. Int J Prosthodont. 1996 Nov-Dec;9 (6):539-46. (slide 55)
  33. Dawson PE. Evaluation, Diagnosis and Treatment of Occlusal Problems. 1989 Mosby Lundeen & Gibbs. The Function of Teeth. 2005 (slide 56)
  34. Lundeen HC, Gibbs C. The Function of Teeth. Book Masters Inc. 2005. Page 30 Library of Congress #2005930209 (slide 57)
  35. Rugh JD, Drago CJ. Vertical Dimension: a Study of Clinical Rest Position… J. Prothet. Dent 45(6):670-675,1991 (slide 61)
  36. Wyke BD. Neuromuscular Mechanisms Influencing Mandibular Posture: A Neurologist’s Review of Current Concepts. J. Dent. 2(3):111-120,1974 (slide61)
  37. Helsing G. Functional Adaptation to Changes in vertical Dimension. J. Prosthet. Dent. 52(6):867-70,1984 (slide 61)
  38. McNeill C. Science and Practice of Occlusion. Quintessence Books. 1997 Chapter 30;(slide 61)





Published date 2012-2015







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