Vesiculobullous and Ulcerative Lesions of the Oral Mucosa
You will receive 2 unit(s) of continuing education credit upon successful completion of this course. The registration fee is only $82.00

Description:
A number of vesiculobullous or vesiculoerosive diseases manifest in the oral cavity. These diseases vary in both frequency and severity. Vesicles are small, circumscribed, fluid-filled elevations that are round or ovoid and are normally less than one centimeter in diameter.

Author:
Dr. Gregory Naylor, DDS
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Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this course participants should be able to do the following: 

  1. Understand the importance of the diagnosis and management of vesiculobullous and ulcerative lesions.
  2. Understand the importance of the use of medications and biopsy in the diagnosis and management of vesiculobullous and ulcerative lesions.
  3. Be aware of the most common medications used in the treatment of these lesions.
     


Abstract:
A number of vesiculobullous or vesiculoerosive diseases manifest in the oral cavity. These diseases vary in both frequency and severity. Vesicles are small, circumscribed, fluid-filled elevations that are round or ovoid and normally less than one centimeter in diameter. A bulla is similar to a vesicle except that it is larger than one centimeter in diameter.
 
When vesicles and bullae rupture they leave secondary lesions known as crusts or erosions. Vesicles and bullae may occur singularly or they may occur in clusters that coalesce into larger lesions. Ulcerative lesions extend through the epithelium into the connective tissue, resulting in pain and possible scarring. Healing takes place with fibroblastic proliferation and scars usually form. Shallow craters that do not extend completely through the epithelium are called erosions. Erosions typically heal without any scar formation.


Outline:
  1. Introduction

  2. Vesiculobullous Lesions

    1. Herpes Viruses

      1. Herpes simplex

      2. Varicella Zoster

      3. Cytomegalovirus

      4. Epstein-Barr Virus

    2. Lichen Planus

    3. Lichenoid Drug Reaction

    4. Erythema Multiforme

      1. Steven's Johnson Syndrome

    5. Pemphigus

    6. Benign Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid

  3. Ulcerative Lesions of the Oral Cavity

    1. Traumatic Ulcers

    2. Recurrent Apthous Stomatitis

    3. Radiation and Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    4. Odontogenic Infection Ulcers

    5. Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    6. Syphilis

  4. Summary
References:

There are no references for this course.







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