Dental Management of the Hypertensive Patient
You will receive 2 unit(s) of continuing education credit upon successful completion of this course. The registration fee is only $82.00

Description:

It is essential that the dentist be familiar with hypertension, the action mechanisms of the medications employed to treat it and their adverse effects, and the significant drug interactions that may occur with these medications.


Author:
Dr. Gregory Naylor, DDS
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Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the importance of the diagnosis of hypertension and how to design treatment plans that will not interfere or exacerbate hypertension.
  2. Be aware of the most common medications utilized in the treatment of hypertension and what oral changes the medications may cause.


Abstract:

Hypertension is a disease that affects approximately 20% of the adult population in the United States. Each year, antihypertensive medications appear on the list of most commonly prescribed drugs.  As the population ages, the number of people taking these medications continues to increase. The dentist frequently manages people who are taking one or more of these medications. Therefore, it is essential that the dentist be familiar with hypertension, the action mechanisms of the medications employed to treat it along with their adverse effects, and the significant drug interactions that may occur with these medications. The dentist has the responsibility to screen patients for hypertension, to refer patients with consistently high readings, and to effectively and safely manage dental patients on chronic, multiple antihypertensive medications.



Outline:

COURSE OUTLINE

  1. Definition and Guidelines for Hypertension

  2. Primary or Essential Hypertension

    1. Genetic factors

    2. Stress

    3. Environmental factors

  3. Secondary Hypertension

  4. Results of Untreated Hypertension

  5. Medical Treatment

  6. Antihypersensitive Medications

    1. Diuretics

    2. Calcium channel blockers

    3. Angiotension converting enzyme inhibitors

    4. Alpha adrenergic blockers

    5. Beta adrenergic blockers

  7. Effect of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs on Antihypertensive Drugs

  8. Dental Management of the Hypertensive Patient

    1. Using local anesthetics with vasoconstrictors

    2. Prevention of orthostatic or postural hypotension

    3. Alleviating or minimizing anxiety

    4. Immediate physician referrals
References:
  1. Bricker SL, Langlais RP, Miller CS. Oral Diagnosis, Oral Medicine, and Treatment Planning.  2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lea and Febiger; 1994.
  2. Little JW, Falace DA. Dental Management of the Medically Compromised Patient.  4th ed. St Louis, MO: Mosby; 1993.
  3. Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure, The Fifth Report. Arch Intern Med; 1993: 153: 154 – 183.
  4. Muzyka BC, Glick M. The Hypertensive Dental Patient. JADA; 1997: 128: 1109 – 1120.






American Dental Association is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider.

ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.