Air Abrasion Dentistry (For the Dentist)
You will receive 4 unit(s) of continuing education credit upon successful completion of this course. The purchase price of this course is $164.00

Description:

This course provides a comprehensive and up-to-date view of the history, physical principles, safety issues and economic considerations of air abrasion dentistry.

Author:
Mark Pitel, DMD, FAGD, FACD, FIADFE
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Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to do the following:

  1. Discuss the differences between preparing teeth with a rotary drill and with air abrasion.

  2. Understand why the use of air abrasion in cavity preparation is more biocompatible than rotary drill preparation.

  3. Describe the cutting ability of air abrasion on the various substrate/materials.

  4. Understand the problems associated with amalgam removal using air abrasion.

  5. List the three levels at which air abrasion can produce significant economic benefits.

  6. Describe the technique used in caries removal/cavity preparation using air abrasion.

  7. Understand the size classification of aluminum oxide particles commonly used in air abrasion dentistry.

  8. Discuss the advantages of bond strength of air abraded teeth with and without acid etching.

  9. Understand the principle of kinetic energy as it relates to the air abrasion technique.

  10. Delineate between the different air abrasion units and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

  11. List and discuss the application of air abrasion for the various clinical techniques.



Abstract:

In the early 1990s, the air abrasion device became a practical and necessary addition to the armamentarium of the modern dental practice. It is useful not only in the restoration of routine cavities, but is also an adjunct in diagnosis, simple repairs, surface treatment of metals and restorative materials and many other functions. This course provides a comprehensive and up-to-date view of the history, physical principles, safety issues and economic considerations of air abrasion dentistry. Clinical examples of its use are shown, along with a brief discussion of where it works best and what features to look for in purchasing a system.


Outline:
  1. Introduction 

    1. History

  2. Comparison of Air Abrasion and Rotary Techniques 

    1. Pain, Vibration, Noise 

    2. Microfracturing 

    3. Conservative Preparations

  3. Biocompatibility 

    1. Pulpal Effects 

      1. Amalgam Removal

  4. Cutting Speed

  5. Economy 

    1. Anesthesia

  6. Safety

  7. Caries Identification and Removal 

    1. Techniques - Soft and Hard Caries

  8. Abrasive Particles 

    1. Sizes and Uses

  9. Bond Strength

  10. Vision - Direct and Indirect

  11. How Air Abrasion Works

  12. Equipment

  13. Clinical Utilization

  14. Summary
References:

There are no references for this course.







American Dental Association is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider.

ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.